How to travel or move to Europe and the UK with a dog or cat

Pet Travel to the European Union | Policies, Documentation Requirements, and Pre-Travel Requisites

Going to Europe with your pet for the first time? The process of getting overseas with your dog is complicated, time-consuming, and expensive. To make your travel planning easier, we’ve outlined everything you need to know to get your four-legged friend overseas with ease. 
The Dangers of Driving with Unrestrained Pets in the Car Reading Pet Travel to the European Union | Policies, Documentation Requirements, and Pre-Travel Requisites 8 minutes Next How and Why to Get Your Dog a European Union Pet Passport

This article was most recently updated in March 2024.

For our honeymoon, Mike and I (Steph) traveled to France and Italy with our dog Django. Planning a trip overseas with our four-legged best friend was complicated, time consuming and expensive... but absolutely worth it. We had an incredible experience with Django in Europe and wouldn't have done the trip any other way. The great news is that travel within the EU and its member states is quite easy with a dog or cat once you are overseas. Even our flight from Paris, France to Milan, Italy, for instance, was easy and stress-free.

If you're considering traveling or moving to the EU with a pet, this article is for you. To make your future travel plans easier, we’ve outlined everything you need to know to get your dog or cat overseas with ease. We already did all of this, so if you have any questions just leave us comment below!

Traveling to Great Britain? If you are planning a trip with a pet to England, Scotland, and/or Wales, we recommending reviewing these two resources: "Flying with Pets In-Cabin to the United Kingdom" and "Pet Travel to Great Britain After Brexit: Policies, Documentation and Pre-Travel Requisites".

How to travel to the European Union with a pet dog or cat

Before your departure, you will need to ensure you have completed all mandated pet travel prerequisites. To make your travel planning easier, we've outlined everything you need to do before your trip.

  • STEP 1: Microchip Identification. If your dog or cat isn't microchipped, he or she needs to be. Every pet entering the EU must be implanted with a 15 digit ISO compliant microchip. If your pet has been microchipped with a non-ISO compliant microchip, you need to either (1) bring your own microchip reader so the microchip can be scanned successfully upon border entry, or (2) microchip your pet a second time with an ISO-compliant chip. Microchipping fees range from $35-100.
  • STEP 2: Rabies Vaccination. Dogs and cats must be vaccinated after microchip implantation. If your pet was already vaccinated but not microchipped (like our little guy Django was before our trip) you need to get your pet both microchipped and re-vaccinated. Re-vaccination can occur on the same day as microchipping. A rabies vaccination usually costs $20-40.
  • STEP 3: 21 Day Waiting Period. Pets that receive rabies vaccinations must wait 21 days before entering the EU. This includes pets that were re-vaccinated upon microchip implant.
  • STEP 4a: Meet with a USDA Accredited Veterinarian. USDA Accredited Veterinarians, surprisingly hard to find, are the only vets able to issue valid EU and International Health Certificates. Locate an Accredited Vet in your area and schedule an International Health Certificate appointment within 10 days of travel abroad (this is key). Accredited vets often charge a fee for the health certificate (ranging from $50-200) as well as a fee for the health exam ($35-75). 
  • STEP 4b: International Health Certificate. Within 10 days of entering the EU, an Accredited Veterinarian must issue an International Health Certificate. The certificate must document the pet’s details (owner information, pet breed, pet age, pet markings, etc), microchip implantation date and number as well as your pet’s rabies vaccination history. See above for fee estimates. The Accredited Vet you work with will have the International Health Certificate template and be well aware of the certificate requirements for completion.
  • STEP 5: APHIS Endorsement. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) must endorse your EU Health Certificate. Oftentimes, the APHIS is located hours away - ours was a 2 hour drive from Philadelphia and we don't have a car - so the document must be overnighted for signature. APHIS endorsement fee averages $30; overnight shipping to/from will cost approximately $25 each way).
  • STEP 6: Tapeworm Treatment (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Ireland, Malta, Finland, and Norway). Tapeworm treatment is required for dogs traveling to the United Kingdom (England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales), Ireland, Finland, Malta, and Norway. Dogs must be treated by a USDA Accredited Veterinarian between 24 and 120 hours (1 and 5 days) before entering these countries. The medication used must be labeled as an effective treatment against tapeworms, specifically Echinococcus multilocularis. Norway specifically requires the use of praziquantel or epsiprantel.  Your Accredited Veterinarian must document the date and time of the tapeworm treatment on your dog's EU Pet Passport or official third country veterinary health certificate.
"For meeting with an accredited veterinarian (Step 4a), aren’t all U.S. veterinarians accredited? How do I find one?"

We are specifically referring to “USDA Accredited Veterinarians”. These are U.S. licensed veterinarians that have formal and additional training from the National Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP) in the state(s) they are licensed to practice medicine in. Accreditation is both state-specific and voluntary. Yes, all vets are licensed to practice veterinary medicine, but not all veterinarians are accredited.

To find a USDA Accredited Veterinarian, first ask your current vet if there is a USDA Accredited Veterinarian within their practice. If no, ask your vet if he/she can refer you to another practice with an USDA Accredited Veterinarian. You can also use this tool from the National Veterinary Accreditation Program to find a USDA Accredited Vet near you.

"What about the EU pet passport? Should I get an EU Pet Passport for my pet dog or cat?"

Getting an EU pet passport is completely optional. If you plan to frequently travel back and forth to the EU with your pet dog or cat, then getting an EU pet passport is a great idea. So long as the pet passport is kept up to date and doesn’t expire, you will not need to go through the extensive international health certificate process detailed above. This will save you both time and money down the road!

Mike and I (Steph) got Django an EU Pet Passport once we arrived in Paris, France. We went to a local veterinary practice down the street from our pet-friendly hotel in Paris' Le Marais neighborhood. The process and our appointment was easy, quick, and worth it! As a pricing reference, a DJANGO customer/reader of ours went this Parisian vet in mid 2023 and said the cost for the pet passport was EUR 95.

Here is a great DJANGO Dog Blog article covering why and how to get an EU Pet Passport for your dog or cat.

Returning to the US

Re-entering the US is fortunately a much simpler process. Most states require a Rabies Vaccination Certificate which documents vaccination details, pet owner information, pet information, and vet information. Select states may require additional information including a certificate of good health issued by a vet, as well as valid registration tags. Before departing on your trip, contact the CDC as well as your state’s import/export department to ensure all proper documentation is in place for a smooth return trip home.

Mike and I returned home via New York JFK airport. I made sure I had Django's Rabies Vaccination Certificate, International Health Certificate, and his new EU Pet Passport in hand when we left the plane. Once we got our luggage, we were directed to the US customs agent responsible for animal and plant inspection (this agent was located at a desk right inside JFK's baggage claim) . The agent reviewed Django's EU Pet Passport and rabies certificate, and within 5 minutes we were in a cab heading home.

* Hawaii and Guam may subject dogs to locally-imposed quarantine requirements depending on the pet's rabies vaccination status.

Below: Django hanging out in his DJANGO Dog Carrier Bag on Paris' Pont des Arts ("Love Locks") Bridge

DJANGO - Little man @djangothegent hanging out in Paris in his DJANGO Pet Tote - djangobrand.com

Additional resources

Planning an international trip with your pup this year or next? Check out DJANGO's most popular international pet travel resources:

34 comments

DJANGO

DJANGO

@JACLYN

What a great update! I’m so glad to know your travels are going smoothy and you’ve had a great experience with your dog so far. We also had a great time with Django overseas. Everywhere we went in France and Italy (restaurants included) was incredibly pet friendly, much more so than the United States.

I really appreciate you sharing that you successfully got a pet passport in Germany. And YES, please share the Köln and Berlin vet recommendations you have! I’ll make sure to add them to our article. Perhaps we’ll even plan content around pet travel from the U.S. to Germany in particular. I visited Germany a few years back (Munich and the greater state of Bavaria) and have been meaning to return with Django and my family.

Good to know about Acaia Love! I had no idea that was the pet-friendly option over there.

That’s very interesting about Vienna. If you don’t mind and have some free time, definitely report back on your Vienna travels. I’d love to hear about your experience there and am curious to know if a muzzle is truly needed. It seems a bit aggressive for a , friendly and non-aggressive dog that’s not prone to biting… but then again, I’m not familiar with the culture there. I have a close relative in Vienna and will ask her about visiting with a dog as well for further insight.

Thanks again for reporting back! I truly appreciate it. Hope you continue to have an amazing time traveling.

Steph

@JACLYN

What a great update! I’m so glad to know your travels are going smoothy and you’ve had a great experience with your dog so far. We also had a great time with Django overseas. Everywhere we went in France and Italy (restaurants included) was incredibly pet friendly, much more so than the United States.

I really appreciate you sharing that you successfully got a pet passport in Germany. And YES, please share the Köln and Berlin vet recommendations you have! I’ll make sure to add them to our article. Perhaps we’ll even plan content around pet travel from the U.S. to Germany in particular. I visited Germany a few years back (Munich and the greater state of Bavaria) and have been meaning to return with Django and my family.

Good to know about Acaia Love! I had no idea that was the pet-friendly option over there.

That’s very interesting about Vienna. If you don’t mind and have some free time, definitely report back on your Vienna travels. I’d love to hear about your experience there and am curious to know if a muzzle is truly needed. It seems a bit aggressive for a , friendly and non-aggressive dog that’s not prone to biting… but then again, I’m not familiar with the culture there. I have a close relative in Vienna and will ask her about visiting with a dog as well for further insight.

Thanks again for reporting back! I truly appreciate it. Hope you continue to have an amazing time traveling.

Steph

Jaclyn

Jaclyn

Hi Steph,

I wanted to follow up and thank you for your help and guidance on getting my pup to Europe. We ended up flying in from Germany instead and flew with KLM. It was a comfortable flight but we weren’t allowed to upgrade our seats but that’s ok.

In Germany we went to the vet in Köln and paid €85 for the check up and Euro passport. We have vet information for Köln and Berlin too if you want to share with your readers.

We are in Prague this current moment and everyone is so pet friendly and accommodating. Even restaurants. The same goes for Berlin and Köln. We have been utilising train, teams and metro. One thing to note is Uber pet is acaia love here and we weren’t aware at the very start but was advised by our Uber driver to use that when booking Ubers.

Next up for us is Vienna but we heard they are a little stricter as our vet told us to get a muzzle when travelling around. Happy to share our experience as well post travel.

Xo
Jaclyn

Hi Steph,

I wanted to follow up and thank you for your help and guidance on getting my pup to Europe. We ended up flying in from Germany instead and flew with KLM. It was a comfortable flight but we weren’t allowed to upgrade our seats but that’s ok.

In Germany we went to the vet in Köln and paid €85 for the check up and Euro passport. We have vet information for Köln and Berlin too if you want to share with your readers.

We are in Prague this current moment and everyone is so pet friendly and accommodating. Even restaurants. The same goes for Berlin and Köln. We have been utilising train, teams and metro. One thing to note is Uber pet is acaia love here and we weren’t aware at the very start but was advised by our Uber driver to use that when booking Ubers.

Next up for us is Vienna but we heard they are a little stricter as our vet told us to get a muzzle when travelling around. Happy to share our experience as well post travel.

Xo
Jaclyn

DJANGO

DJANGO

@NICOLE It’s nice to hear from you, and it’s great to hear you got Weezy his pet passport!

Regarding the tapeworm treatment, it has to be administered between 1 and 5 days (24 and 120 hours) before entry/arrival into the UK (not date of travel). From gov.uk: “A vet must treat your dog for tapeworm and record it in the pet passport or health certificate every time you want to bring it to Great Britain (England, Wales and Scotland). The treatment must have been given no less than 24 hours and no more than 120 hours (5 days) before you enter Great Britain.”

Hope this clarifies it! Also, thank you so much for the kind words about our blog! I am so glad our blog helped you and Weezy!

Steph

@NICOLE It’s nice to hear from you, and it’s great to hear you got Weezy his pet passport!

Regarding the tapeworm treatment, it has to be administered between 1 and 5 days (24 and 120 hours) before entry/arrival into the UK (not date of travel). From gov.uk: “A vet must treat your dog for tapeworm and record it in the pet passport or health certificate every time you want to bring it to Great Britain (England, Wales and Scotland). The treatment must have been given no less than 24 hours and no more than 120 hours (5 days) before you enter Great Britain.”

Hope this clarifies it! Also, thank you so much for the kind words about our blog! I am so glad our blog helped you and Weezy!

Steph

Nicole

Nicole

We got Weezy his passport, and it’s been so great to use! And I am so grateful for your blog about traveling! It’s truly the only comprehensive information I’ve been able to find! I do have one more question. I’m going to the UK, and I see that you say that tapeworm treatment has to be done 1-5 prior to entry. I’m flying from New York to London on a red eye. In this case, is it 1-5 days from date of travel, or 1-5 days from date of arrival? Thanks again for everything!

We got Weezy his passport, and it’s been so great to use! And I am so grateful for your blog about traveling! It’s truly the only comprehensive information I’ve been able to find! I do have one more question. I’m going to the UK, and I see that you say that tapeworm treatment has to be done 1-5 prior to entry. I’m flying from New York to London on a red eye. In this case, is it 1-5 days from date of travel, or 1-5 days from date of arrival? Thanks again for everything!

DJANGO

DJANGO

@MEETA It’s nice to hear from you! We took Django Clinique Vétérinaire de l’Horloge, located at 26 Rue Beaubourg, 75003, and in Paris’ central Le Marais neighborhood. The cost was EUR 50 when we got the passport, although this was 4 years ago so the price is likely higher today.

Regarding tapeworm treatment, you can definitely have this administered in the USA by a USDA accredited veterinarian so long as it is given between 24 and 120 hours (1 and 5 days) before entering the UK and documented properly.

@MEETA It’s nice to hear from you! We took Django Clinique Vétérinaire de l’Horloge, located at 26 Rue Beaubourg, 75003, and in Paris’ central Le Marais neighborhood. The cost was EUR 50 when we got the passport, although this was 4 years ago so the price is likely higher today.

Regarding tapeworm treatment, you can definitely have this administered in the USA by a USDA accredited veterinarian so long as it is given between 24 and 120 hours (1 and 5 days) before entering the UK and documented properly.

Meeta

Meeta

Hi, I am traveling with my pup to Europe next month and would love to get him his pet passport. Would you mind sharing your vet recommendation in Paris? Also- I had a quick question for you- would it be possible to get my pup his tapeworm treatment right before we leave the states so that he will already have it when we make our way to the UK (within 3 days of landing)? Or would I have to get it in Europe? Thank you so much for sharing your recommendation. I’ve been doing so much research on trying to bring the pup with me and it would be so helpful to go to a vet that i know can help!Hi

Hi, I am traveling with my pup to Europe next month and would love to get him his pet passport. Would you mind sharing your vet recommendation in Paris? Also- I had a quick question for you- would it be possible to get my pup his tapeworm treatment right before we leave the states so that he will already have it when we make our way to the UK (within 3 days of landing)? Or would I have to get it in Europe? Thank you so much for sharing your recommendation. I’ve been doing so much research on trying to bring the pup with me and it would be so helpful to go to a vet that i know can help!Hi

DJANGO

DJANGO

@MARGORIE Hi! You ask all great questions, and I’ll do my best to answer each of them thoroughly.

Question: For meeting with an accredited veterinarian (step 4a) -aren’t all veterinarians accredited? Is this for a vet in the United States
Answer: We are specifically referring to “USDA Accredited Veterinarians”. These are U.S. licensed veterinarians that have formal and additional training from the National Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP). Accreditation is state-specific and voluntary. Yes, all legitimate veterinarians are licensed to practice veterinary medicine, but not all veterinarians are USDA Accredited.

Question: What kind of accreditation should I ask they have? -How do I find one?
Answer: Ask your current vet if there is a USDA Accredited Veterinarian within their practice. If no, ask your vet if he/she can refer you to another practice with an USDA Accredited Veterinarian. You can also use this tool from the National Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP) to find a USDA Accredited Vet near you. Copy/paste the below link into a new browser bar:
>> https://vsapps.aphis.usda.gov/vsps/public/VetSearch.do?method=display <<

Question: My regular vet is a licensed veterinarian is that enough?
Answer: No, you specifically need a USDA Accredited Veterinarian. If your regular vet happens to be a USDA Accredited Vet, great. If not, you need to find one elsewhere.

Question: Where can I find an international health certificate template (step 4a)? Is this something the vet would have?
Answer: The USDA Accredited Vet you work with will have the up-to-date international health certificate template. Keep in mind the health certificate will be unique based on where you are traveling and the circumstances of your travel (i.e. you will need the EU’s standard health certificate if you’re traveling to the EU with a pet dog).

Question: Step 4b: speaks about another international health certificate within 10 days of arrival, is this the same certificate as step 4a (they have the same name)? -Is this one done by a vet in Europe? -how do I find an accredited one?
Answer: We are referring to the same international health certificate in both Steps 4a and 4b. This form is completed by a USDA Accredited Veterinarian in the United States before your trip overseas.

Question: Step 5: APHIS Endorsement -is this the endorsement of the health certificate given by a vet in the United States or the one given by the European vet? -Is this a new rule? The embassy website doesn’t make mention of it https://it.usembassy.gov/embassy-consulates/rome/sections-offices/foreign-agricultural-service/pet-travel-faqs-italy-u-s/
Answer: Once your USDA Accredited Vet fills out your international health certificate, you must get it endorsed by the U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). The APHIS is not a vet; it is an animal/plant inspection team. You will likely have to overnight the completed health certificate to APHIS unless they happen to have an office near you. APHIS will endorse your international health certificate and overnight it back to you. You have to pay for these shipping costs.

Question: What about the EU pet passport?
Answer: Getting an EU pet passport is completely optional. If you plan to frequently travel back and forth to the EU with your pet dog or cat, then getting an EU pet passport is a great idea. So long as the pet passport is kept up to date and doesn’t expire, you will not need to go through the international health certificate process detailed above, saving you both time and money down the road.

Question: Where and when do I get one?
Answer: You can get an EU pet passport from most (if not all) licensed EU vets. Once you arrive in your destination EU country, call a local vet and ask them if they can issue a EU pet passport.

Question: Do I need an American pet passport? If so how do I go about getting one?
Answer: No, for your first trip overseas you will need to obtain an international health certificate (the process detailed above).

@MARGORIE Hi! You ask all great questions, and I’ll do my best to answer each of them thoroughly.

Question: For meeting with an accredited veterinarian (step 4a) -aren’t all veterinarians accredited? Is this for a vet in the United States
Answer: We are specifically referring to “USDA Accredited Veterinarians”. These are U.S. licensed veterinarians that have formal and additional training from the National Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP). Accreditation is state-specific and voluntary. Yes, all legitimate veterinarians are licensed to practice veterinary medicine, but not all veterinarians are USDA Accredited.

Question: What kind of accreditation should I ask they have? -How do I find one?
Answer: Ask your current vet if there is a USDA Accredited Veterinarian within their practice. If no, ask your vet if he/she can refer you to another practice with an USDA Accredited Veterinarian. You can also use this tool from the National Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP) to find a USDA Accredited Vet near you. Copy/paste the below link into a new browser bar:
>> https://vsapps.aphis.usda.gov/vsps/public/VetSearch.do?method=display <<

Question: My regular vet is a licensed veterinarian is that enough?
Answer: No, you specifically need a USDA Accredited Veterinarian. If your regular vet happens to be a USDA Accredited Vet, great. If not, you need to find one elsewhere.

Question: Where can I find an international health certificate template (step 4a)? Is this something the vet would have?
Answer: The USDA Accredited Vet you work with will have the up-to-date international health certificate template. Keep in mind the health certificate will be unique based on where you are traveling and the circumstances of your travel (i.e. you will need the EU’s standard health certificate if you’re traveling to the EU with a pet dog).

Question: Step 4b: speaks about another international health certificate within 10 days of arrival, is this the same certificate as step 4a (they have the same name)? -Is this one done by a vet in Europe? -how do I find an accredited one?
Answer: We are referring to the same international health certificate in both Steps 4a and 4b. This form is completed by a USDA Accredited Veterinarian in the United States before your trip overseas.

Question: Step 5: APHIS Endorsement -is this the endorsement of the health certificate given by a vet in the United States or the one given by the European vet? -Is this a new rule? The embassy website doesn’t make mention of it https://it.usembassy.gov/embassy-consulates/rome/sections-offices/foreign-agricultural-service/pet-travel-faqs-italy-u-s/
Answer: Once your USDA Accredited Vet fills out your international health certificate, you must get it endorsed by the U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). The APHIS is not a vet; it is an animal/plant inspection team. You will likely have to overnight the completed health certificate to APHIS unless they happen to have an office near you. APHIS will endorse your international health certificate and overnight it back to you. You have to pay for these shipping costs.

Question: What about the EU pet passport?
Answer: Getting an EU pet passport is completely optional. If you plan to frequently travel back and forth to the EU with your pet dog or cat, then getting an EU pet passport is a great idea. So long as the pet passport is kept up to date and doesn’t expire, you will not need to go through the international health certificate process detailed above, saving you both time and money down the road.

Question: Where and when do I get one?
Answer: You can get an EU pet passport from most (if not all) licensed EU vets. Once you arrive in your destination EU country, call a local vet and ask them if they can issue a EU pet passport.

Question: Do I need an American pet passport? If so how do I go about getting one?
Answer: No, for your first trip overseas you will need to obtain an international health certificate (the process detailed above).

DJANGO

DJANGO

@EMILY Hello, and thanks for your question about Germany and whether Germany customs will allow the import of your pets’ American dog food. I linked below to a great resource for you from zoll.de (Germany customs). In a nutshell, the import of pet food is generally accepted, BUT restrictions may apply depending on the ingredients and contents of your pet’s vet-approved food. I recommend reviewing the below article so you can learn about the various restricted ingredients, and then contacting Germany’s customs department directly so they can review your exact pet food. It would also make sense to send them a photo of your pet food ingredient/nutrition label so they can properly review all ingredients and advise whether the pet food will be allowed into the country. There is a ‘Contact’ button on the upper right corner of the page I linked to below.

The private import of food and animal feed into Germany:
>> https://www.zoll.de/EN/Private-individuals/Travel/Entering-Germany/Restrictions/Food-and-feed/food-and-feed_node.html <<

Hope this helps! Best of luck with your upcoming move to Berlin! Very exciting :)
Steph (and Django)

@EMILY Hello, and thanks for your question about Germany and whether Germany customs will allow the import of your pets’ American dog food. I linked below to a great resource for you from zoll.de (Germany customs). In a nutshell, the import of pet food is generally accepted, BUT restrictions may apply depending on the ingredients and contents of your pet’s vet-approved food. I recommend reviewing the below article so you can learn about the various restricted ingredients, and then contacting Germany’s customs department directly so they can review your exact pet food. It would also make sense to send them a photo of your pet food ingredient/nutrition label so they can properly review all ingredients and advise whether the pet food will be allowed into the country. There is a ‘Contact’ button on the upper right corner of the page I linked to below.

The private import of food and animal feed into Germany:
>> https://www.zoll.de/EN/Private-individuals/Travel/Entering-Germany/Restrictions/Food-and-feed/food-and-feed_node.html <<

Hope this helps! Best of luck with your upcoming move to Berlin! Very exciting :)
Steph (and Django)

Margorie

Margorie

Hello,
We’re planning to travel with our dog from the U.S to Italy and I was hoping you could help clarify some questions.

•For meeting with an accredited veterinarian (step 4a)
-aren’t all veterinarians accredited?
-Is this for a vet in the United States?
-What kind of accreditation should I ask they have?
-How do I find one?
-My regular vet is a licensed veterinarian is that enough?

•where can I find an international health certificate template (step 4a)?
Is this something the vet would have?
I asked my local vet and she doesn’t, she only has regular health certificates.

•step 4b: speaks about another international health certificate within 10 days of arrival, is this the same certificate as step 4a (they have the same name)?
-Is this one done by a vet in Europe?
-how do I find an accredited one?

•step 5: APHIS Endorsement
-is this the endorsement of the health certificate given by a vet in the United States or the one given by the European vet?
-Is this a new rule? The embassy website doesn’t make mention of it https://it.usembassy.gov/embassy-consulates/rome/sections-offices/foreign-agricultural-service/pet-travel-faqs-italy-u-s/

•what about the EU pet passport? Where and when do I get one?

•do I need an American pet passport? If so how do I go about getting one?

Sorry for all the questions. I’ve visited so many government sites and they each have different info. I appreciate your time and help with this.

Hello,
We’re planning to travel with our dog from the U.S to Italy and I was hoping you could help clarify some questions.

•For meeting with an accredited veterinarian (step 4a)
-aren’t all veterinarians accredited?
-Is this for a vet in the United States?
-What kind of accreditation should I ask they have?
-How do I find one?
-My regular vet is a licensed veterinarian is that enough?

•where can I find an international health certificate template (step 4a)?
Is this something the vet would have?
I asked my local vet and she doesn’t, she only has regular health certificates.

•step 4b: speaks about another international health certificate within 10 days of arrival, is this the same certificate as step 4a (they have the same name)?
-Is this one done by a vet in Europe?
-how do I find an accredited one?

•step 5: APHIS Endorsement
-is this the endorsement of the health certificate given by a vet in the United States or the one given by the European vet?
-Is this a new rule? The embassy website doesn’t make mention of it https://it.usembassy.gov/embassy-consulates/rome/sections-offices/foreign-agricultural-service/pet-travel-faqs-italy-u-s/

•what about the EU pet passport? Where and when do I get one?

•do I need an American pet passport? If so how do I go about getting one?

Sorry for all the questions. I’ve visited so many government sites and they each have different info. I appreciate your time and help with this.

Emily

Emily

Thank you for this wonderful resource! We’re moving to Berlin from the US in June (2022) with our cat and dog. Both pets will have passports and our dog is a service dog.

Does customs in Germany accept American dog food? Both of our animals are seniors and have very specific vet-approved diets. If we need to transition them to German pet food diets we can, we’d just need to likely start now!

Any assistance here is helpful.

Thank you!

Thank you for this wonderful resource! We’re moving to Berlin from the US in June (2022) with our cat and dog. Both pets will have passports and our dog is a service dog.

Does customs in Germany accept American dog food? Both of our animals are seniors and have very specific vet-approved diets. If we need to transition them to German pet food diets we can, we’d just need to likely start now!

Any assistance here is helpful.

Thank you!

Kristina Bell

Kristina Bell

Thanks for the response- I will keep a lookout for the carrier!

Thanks for the response- I will keep a lookout for the carrier!

DJANGO

DJANGO

@KRISTINA BELL Hello! I’m so glad to hear you have been finding our DJANGO Dog Blog articles on pet travel to the EU so helpful! That’s wonderful to hear.

Regarding pet carriers suitable for airplane travel, we are actually designing a beautiful DJANGO pet carrier of our own right now! In the past, we’ve used Sherpa’s standard airplane bag for our dachshund, Django. We have size large since Django is also on the longer side – it measures 18-19" in length, I believe. Even with size large, given Django’s 16" back length (neck to base of tail), he still is a little too long for the carrier. Unfortunately, most major U.S. airlines don’t allow pet carriers beyond 18-19" in length so our options are limited.

@KRISTINA BELL Hello! I’m so glad to hear you have been finding our DJANGO Dog Blog articles on pet travel to the EU so helpful! That’s wonderful to hear.

Regarding pet carriers suitable for airplane travel, we are actually designing a beautiful DJANGO pet carrier of our own right now! In the past, we’ve used Sherpa’s standard airplane bag for our dachshund, Django. We have size large since Django is also on the longer side – it measures 18-19" in length, I believe. Even with size large, given Django’s 16" back length (neck to base of tail), he still is a little too long for the carrier. Unfortunately, most major U.S. airlines don’t allow pet carriers beyond 18-19" in length so our options are limited.

kristina bell

kristina bell

Very glad to have found this blog. Some of the instructions on how to get all the documents and everything has been slightly confusing, you just cleared up that Tapeworm outlier for me.. so thank you! Quick question: I also have a long hot dog (dachshund : D ) Do you have a recommendation for what carrier you have used in the past to travel with? With my Bernard being so “long” carriers have been slightly hard to come by.

Thanks in advance!

Very glad to have found this blog. Some of the instructions on how to get all the documents and everything has been slightly confusing, you just cleared up that Tapeworm outlier for me.. so thank you! Quick question: I also have a long hot dog (dachshund : D ) Do you have a recommendation for what carrier you have used in the past to travel with? With my Bernard being so “long” carriers have been slightly hard to come by.

Thanks in advance!

DJANGO

DJANGO

@VIMARI COLON-LEON Thanks for the question! If you are traveling from the United States to the European Union with a pet dog or cat, then yes, you need a “non-commercial” health certificate. Pets must arrive in the EU within 10 days from the date that the USDA Accredited Veterinarian signs the health certificate, and the EU health certificate is valid for travel within the EU for up to 4 months from the date it is issued (so long as the rabies vaccine documented on it does not expire). You do not need a second health certificate for your return trip.

@VIMARI COLON-LEON Thanks for the question! If you are traveling from the United States to the European Union with a pet dog or cat, then yes, you need a “non-commercial” health certificate. Pets must arrive in the EU within 10 days from the date that the USDA Accredited Veterinarian signs the health certificate, and the EU health certificate is valid for travel within the EU for up to 4 months from the date it is issued (so long as the rabies vaccine documented on it does not expire). You do not need a second health certificate for your return trip.

Vimari Colon-Leon

Vimari Colon-Leon

Hi! Thanks for all the information. I would like yo clarify something. Do I need a new health certificate if I travel from the US to the EU for just two weeks? My concern is if I need to do a new one to return. Thanks!

Hi! Thanks for all the information. I would like yo clarify something. Do I need a new health certificate if I travel from the US to the EU for just two weeks? My concern is if I need to do a new one to return. Thanks!

DJANGO

DJANGO

@ELIZABETH Hey there! Yes, I can definitely give you the name of the vet in Paris. We took Django to Clinique Vétérinaire de l’Horloge. The address is 26 Rue Beaubourg, 75003, and in Paris’ central Le Marais neighborhood. The cost was EUR 50 when we did it in 2017.

So glad to hear you’ve been finding our info useful! – Steph (and Django)

@ELIZABETH Hey there! Yes, I can definitely give you the name of the vet in Paris. We took Django to Clinique Vétérinaire de l’Horloge. The address is 26 Rue Beaubourg, 75003, and in Paris’ central Le Marais neighborhood. The cost was EUR 50 when we did it in 2017.

So glad to hear you’ve been finding our info useful! – Steph (and Django)

Elizabeth

Elizabeth

Hey there! I was reading your very informative and helpful blog and was wondering if I can get the vet recommendation for the European passport in Paris. I would also like to thank you for all your information thus far!

Hey there! I was reading your very informative and helpful blog and was wondering if I can get the vet recommendation for the European passport in Paris. I would also like to thank you for all your information thus far!

DJANGO

DJANGO

@JAMIE TROY Hello! Django had never been microchipped before we starting planning our trip to Europe, so he did need both a microchip and rabies vaccination. Although Django had already received his rabies vaccination a year prior to his microchip, dogs and cats must be vaccinated for rabies after microchip implantation. I believe it was at the same appointment where Django was microchipped and then re-vaccinated for rabies. Our vet confirmed there was no problem with giving Django another rabies shot just one year after his last.

There were no issues with the microchip at all! The vet did the microchip implantation right in front of me. He used a needle and implanted the chip in the back of Django’s neck where there is a lot of skin between the shoulder blades. If I recall correctly, Django didn’t even flinch. He also didn’t show any signs of discomfort afterwards. It was a very easy process!

Hope this helps! Definitely reach back out if you have more questions! – Steph

@JAMIE TROY Hello! Django had never been microchipped before we starting planning our trip to Europe, so he did need both a microchip and rabies vaccination. Although Django had already received his rabies vaccination a year prior to his microchip, dogs and cats must be vaccinated for rabies after microchip implantation. I believe it was at the same appointment where Django was microchipped and then re-vaccinated for rabies. Our vet confirmed there was no problem with giving Django another rabies shot just one year after his last.

There were no issues with the microchip at all! The vet did the microchip implantation right in front of me. He used a needle and implanted the chip in the back of Django’s neck where there is a lot of skin between the shoulder blades. If I recall correctly, Django didn’t even flinch. He also didn’t show any signs of discomfort afterwards. It was a very easy process!

Hope this helps! Definitely reach back out if you have more questions! – Steph

jamie troy

jamie troy

Hi,
did your dog need a rabies booster? did you have any issues with the microchip? thank you.

Hi,
did your dog need a rabies booster? did you have any issues with the microchip? thank you.

DJANGO

DJANGO

@KATY Hello! It’s nice to hear from you, and thanks for all the questions. Here is a great DJANGO Dog Blog resource to determine which international airlines allow in-cabin pet travel to France:
>> https://djangobrand.com/blogs/news/international-airline-pet-policies-for-in-cabin-travel

I can’t tell you where to fly from as I don’t know where you live, but CDG is the largest international airport in France and usually the best (or only) option when flying from the US to Paris. My husband and I were living in NYC and flew with our dog Django from JFK International Airport to Paris Charles de Gaulle (CDG). Many international airlines offer in-cabin pet service from NYC-CDG including Air France and Delta.

Regarding the antibody test, this is not required if you are entering the UK from the EU and listed Non-EU countries. With that said, dogs MUST be updated on their rabies vaccinations. Vaccinations valid for 1, 2 or 3 years are acceptable as long as the rabies vaccination is current and has been administered according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. You should also have your dog’s rabies vaccination certificate with you when traveling to the EU.

Once you are at CDG airport, you have a few options to get into the UK. I can’t tell you which option is most cost effective today (renting a car vs. pet chauffeur service) since I do not know the length of your stay or where you are going in the UK. You must also consider whether you want to driving a left-hand drive vehicle in a right-hand drive country – it’s not typically easy or even enjoyable. A pet chauffeur service is definitely the most hassle-free option. Each France-to-UK pet travel option and the pros and cons are outlined in this DJANGO Dog Blog Article:
>> https://djangobrand.com/blogs/news/flying-with-pets-in-cabin-to-the-united-kingdom

When taking the ferry from Calais, all pets must be checked in and documents reviewed at least one hour before departure. The main documents you need are your dog’s International Health Certificate (including confirmation of tapeworm treatment since you’re going to the UK) and your dog’s rabies vaccination certificate. Ferry pet bookings must be made well in advance. I am not personally familiar with each ferry company, but from what I know they do not require additional health certificates/documentation aside from what is already needed for your international pet travels. With that said, pet policies can change on a whim, so we always advise confirming the pet policies of your airline/ferry prior to booking travel.

@KATY Hello! It’s nice to hear from you, and thanks for all the questions. Here is a great DJANGO Dog Blog resource to determine which international airlines allow in-cabin pet travel to France:
>> https://djangobrand.com/blogs/news/international-airline-pet-policies-for-in-cabin-travel

I can’t tell you where to fly from as I don’t know where you live, but CDG is the largest international airport in France and usually the best (or only) option when flying from the US to Paris. My husband and I were living in NYC and flew with our dog Django from JFK International Airport to Paris Charles de Gaulle (CDG). Many international airlines offer in-cabin pet service from NYC-CDG including Air France and Delta.

Regarding the antibody test, this is not required if you are entering the UK from the EU and listed Non-EU countries. With that said, dogs MUST be updated on their rabies vaccinations. Vaccinations valid for 1, 2 or 3 years are acceptable as long as the rabies vaccination is current and has been administered according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. You should also have your dog’s rabies vaccination certificate with you when traveling to the EU.

Once you are at CDG airport, you have a few options to get into the UK. I can’t tell you which option is most cost effective today (renting a car vs. pet chauffeur service) since I do not know the length of your stay or where you are going in the UK. You must also consider whether you want to driving a left-hand drive vehicle in a right-hand drive country – it’s not typically easy or even enjoyable. A pet chauffeur service is definitely the most hassle-free option. Each France-to-UK pet travel option and the pros and cons are outlined in this DJANGO Dog Blog Article:
>> https://djangobrand.com/blogs/news/flying-with-pets-in-cabin-to-the-united-kingdom

When taking the ferry from Calais, all pets must be checked in and documents reviewed at least one hour before departure. The main documents you need are your dog’s International Health Certificate (including confirmation of tapeworm treatment since you’re going to the UK) and your dog’s rabies vaccination certificate. Ferry pet bookings must be made well in advance. I am not personally familiar with each ferry company, but from what I know they do not require additional health certificates/documentation aside from what is already needed for your international pet travels. With that said, pet policies can change on a whim, so we always advise confirming the pet policies of your airline/ferry prior to booking travel.

Katy

Katy

Hello, I see you had trouble getting Django into the UK from the USA. I am having the exact same problem. I don’t know which airline to fly with, what airports to fly from and to. I see you decided to fly into France which is a great idea. I just have a few questions about that. What airline and airports did you use? I know you flew into Paris.. did they require a rabies antibody titration test? I am on the paris airport website and it says that 3 months before this is required.. however, a paragraph down states domestic carnivores from the following territories and third countries are exempt from the rabies antibody titration test and the United States of America is on that list.. can you confirm if I need to get my puppy one or not? Also, once you were in France would you recommend the rent a car and then use the ferry to get into Dover as the easiest and most cost effective route? Also, once you were in Dover did the UK just require all the documentations from the health certificate and that was it? I saw your article on flying into Heathrow but because I am no longer flying into the UK and instead sailing in on a ferry what documentations does she need on arrival in the UK? Are there requirements from the Ferry company and the destinations of the ferry in Calais and Dover?

Hello, I see you had trouble getting Django into the UK from the USA. I am having the exact same problem. I don’t know which airline to fly with, what airports to fly from and to. I see you decided to fly into France which is a great idea. I just have a few questions about that. What airline and airports did you use? I know you flew into Paris.. did they require a rabies antibody titration test? I am on the paris airport website and it says that 3 months before this is required.. however, a paragraph down states domestic carnivores from the following territories and third countries are exempt from the rabies antibody titration test and the United States of America is on that list.. can you confirm if I need to get my puppy one or not? Also, once you were in France would you recommend the rent a car and then use the ferry to get into Dover as the easiest and most cost effective route? Also, once you were in Dover did the UK just require all the documentations from the health certificate and that was it? I saw your article on flying into Heathrow but because I am no longer flying into the UK and instead sailing in on a ferry what documentations does she need on arrival in the UK? Are there requirements from the Ferry company and the destinations of the ferry in Calais and Dover?

Krish Surana

Krish Surana

Great content for your niche audience!

Great content for your niche audience!

DJANGO

DJANGO

@VIV Thank you for the comment! For those who are not familiar with leishmania, it is a parasitic protozoan transmitted by infected female sand flea bites. Leishmania is most prevalent in Israel, Turkey, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan (80% of total cases). It has also been documented in Albania, Georgia, Italy and Spain.

For more information, here is a link to a fact sheet published by the World Health Organization:
http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/246166/Fact-sheet-Leishmaniasis-Eng.pdf?ua=1

@VIV Thank you for the comment! For those who are not familiar with leishmania, it is a parasitic protozoan transmitted by infected female sand flea bites. Leishmania is most prevalent in Israel, Turkey, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan (80% of total cases). It has also been documented in Albania, Georgia, Italy and Spain.

For more information, here is a link to a fact sheet published by the World Health Organization:
http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/246166/Fact-sheet-Leishmaniasis-Eng.pdf?ua=1

Viv

Viv

please be aware of illness like leishmania/leishmaniasis if you travel to Europe and visit countries in the Mediterranean region (i.e Italy, France,Spain,Greece etc). The signs are quite varied and mostly taken as ‘just an infection’ and hard to recognize. 100% cure is not possible but the dog can live for a long time on long-term meds and needs to be monitored. please tell your vet your dogs been to these countries if your dog is not him/herself as this is easier to treat if you start early with medication.

please be aware of illness like leishmania/leishmaniasis if you travel to Europe and visit countries in the Mediterranean region (i.e Italy, France,Spain,Greece etc). The signs are quite varied and mostly taken as ‘just an infection’ and hard to recognize. 100% cure is not possible but the dog can live for a long time on long-term meds and needs to be monitored. please tell your vet your dogs been to these countries if your dog is not him/herself as this is easier to treat if you start early with medication.

DJANGO

DJANGO

@NICOLE Hello! Steph here (not Amanda – no Amandas here at DJANGO). To re-enter the US, your dog will need a valid rabies vaccination certificate. Assuming his or her previous rabies vaccination hasn’t expired, the original certificate is what you need. Additionally, some states including New York require a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) issued 30 days or less prior to entry. The exception is for dogs that are New York residents and (1) have proof of current dog license (2) have a valid rabies vaccination certificate, and (3) are returning from out-of-state travel within one year. This means that if you’re a NY State resident and the above 3 items apply, you can re-enter NY without a CVI.

Worth emphasizing that your airline may still require a CVI to accompany your dog on a flight. So even if you’re a NY State resident, you still may need the CVI. Definitely worth confirming with your airline.

If you are not a NY resident, you need to check your resident state requirements by viewing their animal import/export page.

As for a pet passport, this is not needed if you get a CVI. With that said, getting a pet passport now will save you money down the road if you plan to travel back and forth to the UK with your dog.

Regarding airlines, United, Delta and American all allow ESA dogs in-cabin to and from the UK. With that said, leaving the UK with a dog is much easier than entering the UK! More airlines allow dogs in cabin when they are departing from the UK. I suggest calling your airline of choice and confirming this with them before booking travel.

@NICOLE Hello! Steph here (not Amanda – no Amandas here at DJANGO). To re-enter the US, your dog will need a valid rabies vaccination certificate. Assuming his or her previous rabies vaccination hasn’t expired, the original certificate is what you need. Additionally, some states including New York require a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) issued 30 days or less prior to entry. The exception is for dogs that are New York residents and (1) have proof of current dog license (2) have a valid rabies vaccination certificate, and (3) are returning from out-of-state travel within one year. This means that if you’re a NY State resident and the above 3 items apply, you can re-enter NY without a CVI.

Worth emphasizing that your airline may still require a CVI to accompany your dog on a flight. So even if you’re a NY State resident, you still may need the CVI. Definitely worth confirming with your airline.

If you are not a NY resident, you need to check your resident state requirements by viewing their animal import/export page.

As for a pet passport, this is not needed if you get a CVI. With that said, getting a pet passport now will save you money down the road if you plan to travel back and forth to the UK with your dog.

Regarding airlines, United, Delta and American all allow ESA dogs in-cabin to and from the UK. With that said, leaving the UK with a dog is much easier than entering the UK! More airlines allow dogs in cabin when they are departing from the UK. I suggest calling your airline of choice and confirming this with them before booking travel.

Nicole

Nicole

Hi Amanda!

Would you kindly give some more insight on traveling back to the US from the UK with your dog?

I had brought my 20lbs corgi mix with me to the UK from the US (as an ESA in cabin) on Jan 1 and entered the UK with all the necessary paperwork (tapeworm, rabies vaccine, IHC etc.)

I will be returning to the US (new york, JFK) in 2 months and was wondering if I needed to get a new international health certificate issued from a vet in the UK or does the original one I entered the UK with work? Does this replace the EU pet passport or is the EU pet passport something I will need as well? I still have his rabies certificate in hand so that’s all set.

I read that you had also flown into JFK airport. Would you please advise which airline allowed you to have Django in cabin with you as an ESA?

Thanks!

Nicole

Hi Amanda!

Would you kindly give some more insight on traveling back to the US from the UK with your dog?

I had brought my 20lbs corgi mix with me to the UK from the US (as an ESA in cabin) on Jan 1 and entered the UK with all the necessary paperwork (tapeworm, rabies vaccine, IHC etc.)

I will be returning to the US (new york, JFK) in 2 months and was wondering if I needed to get a new international health certificate issued from a vet in the UK or does the original one I entered the UK with work? Does this replace the EU pet passport or is the EU pet passport something I will need as well? I still have his rabies certificate in hand so that’s all set.

I read that you had also flown into JFK airport. Would you please advise which airline allowed you to have Django in cabin with you as an ESA?

Thanks!

Nicole

DJANGO

DJANGO

@BARBARA ROESSLER Hi Barbara! As long as your pup is up to date on his rabies vaccination, you do not need to do a a rabies antibody titer. Rabies vaccinations valid for 1, 2 or 3 years are accepted by EU member states so long as the rabies vaccination is current (aka it has not expired) and has been administered according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. In addition to an EU health certificate, you should bring your pup’s rabies vaccination certificate with you when you travel.

Is your pup microchipped? If not, this would be the only reason why he or she would need to be RE-vaccinated (on the same day as or AFTER microchip implantation).

Does this answer your question? Let me know please!

@BARBARA ROESSLER Hi Barbara! As long as your pup is up to date on his rabies vaccination, you do not need to do a a rabies antibody titer. Rabies vaccinations valid for 1, 2 or 3 years are accepted by EU member states so long as the rabies vaccination is current (aka it has not expired) and has been administered according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. In addition to an EU health certificate, you should bring your pup’s rabies vaccination certificate with you when you travel.

Is your pup microchipped? If not, this would be the only reason why he or she would need to be RE-vaccinated (on the same day as or AFTER microchip implantation).

Does this answer your question? Let me know please!

Barbara Roessler

Barbara Roessler

We traveled with our Wirehaired Dachshund to Europe over 10 years ago. We are planning on traveling with our new pup. Prior to the last trip we used a Titer to ascertain he had an active and sufficient amount of rabies vaccination. Is that no longer allowed? It can’t be healthy to over vaccinate. Thank you.

We traveled with our Wirehaired Dachshund to Europe over 10 years ago. We are planning on traveling with our new pup. Prior to the last trip we used a Titer to ascertain he had an active and sufficient amount of rabies vaccination. Is that no longer allowed? It can’t be healthy to over vaccinate. Thank you.

DJANGO

DJANGO

@MINI, hello! Thanks for reaching out. Congrats on your upcoming move to the UK, but I’m sorry to hear it’s been causing you so much stress! Traveling internationally with a pet is definitely a complicated and overwhelming process. We’re just trying to make the process as easy and straightforward as possible for our dog and travel loving friends.

Django weighs 14lbs (6.4kg). You’re correct that airlines have weight restrictions for in-cabin pet travel; most max weights are in the 18-20lb area although there are variabilities by airline. This DJANGO Dog Blog article details the pet policies of all the major international airlines – you’ll probably find this useful: https://djangobrand.com/blogs/news/international-airline-pet-policies-for-in-cabin-travel

Making your pom an ESA would definitely help. The UK actually allows ESAs to travel in-cabin into London Heathrow, although there is a hefty one-time fee when you arrive. Did you see our article on pet travel to the UK? This has tons of useful information for you: https://djangobrand.com/blogs/news/flying-with-pets-in-cabin-to-the-united-kingdom.


Feel free to reach out if you have any additional questions of course.

@MINI, hello! Thanks for reaching out. Congrats on your upcoming move to the UK, but I’m sorry to hear it’s been causing you so much stress! Traveling internationally with a pet is definitely a complicated and overwhelming process. We’re just trying to make the process as easy and straightforward as possible for our dog and travel loving friends.

Django weighs 14lbs (6.4kg). You’re correct that airlines have weight restrictions for in-cabin pet travel; most max weights are in the 18-20lb area although there are variabilities by airline. This DJANGO Dog Blog article details the pet policies of all the major international airlines – you’ll probably find this useful: https://djangobrand.com/blogs/news/international-airline-pet-policies-for-in-cabin-travel

Making your pom an ESA would definitely help. The UK actually allows ESAs to travel in-cabin into London Heathrow, although there is a hefty one-time fee when you arrive. Did you see our article on pet travel to the UK? This has tons of useful information for you: https://djangobrand.com/blogs/news/flying-with-pets-in-cabin-to-the-united-kingdom.


Feel free to reach out if you have any additional questions of course.

Mini

Mini

Hi Steph,
Thanks so much for writing this blog. I can’t tell you how much this helps. I am moving to UK next month and this blog has saved me tons of time researching unnecessarily. As you can imagine, with the strict rules for in-cabin travel to UK, I am super nervous (have panic attacks on a daily basis with tears and all) about my move and I trying to see if I can get my babe Skippy as an ESA. Can you tell me how much does Django weighs?
Skippy is almost 10 kg Pomeranian so taking him anything other than ESA likely won’t be possible. I am keeping my fingers crossed for a miracle.
Is it okay if I reach out to you for a few more clarifying questions about your travel to UK and EU in general.

Thanks so much again.
Mini

Hi Steph,
Thanks so much for writing this blog. I can’t tell you how much this helps. I am moving to UK next month and this blog has saved me tons of time researching unnecessarily. As you can imagine, with the strict rules for in-cabin travel to UK, I am super nervous (have panic attacks on a daily basis with tears and all) about my move and I trying to see if I can get my babe Skippy as an ESA. Can you tell me how much does Django weighs?
Skippy is almost 10 kg Pomeranian so taking him anything other than ESA likely won’t be possible. I am keeping my fingers crossed for a miracle.
Is it okay if I reach out to you for a few more clarifying questions about your travel to UK and EU in general.

Thanks so much again.
Mini

DJANGO

DJANGO

@AMANDA Hello! Great to hear from you, and thanks for the great question. If you are traveling to the UK (England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales) with your dog, tapeworm treatment can occur before or after APHIS endorsement of your health certificate.

So, for example, let’s say you take your dog to a USDA Accredited Vet 10 days prior to travel and the vet issues your UK health certificate – at this point the tapeworm treatment section on the certificate will be blank. You then overnight the health certificate to the APHIS for endorsement. Once you receive back the endorsed health certificate, take it back to your USDA Accredited Vet within 1-5 days of entry into the UK. The vet will administer your dog’s tapeworm (Echinococcus multilocularis) treatment and fill in the tapeworm section on the certificate.

Hope this helps! Safe travels :)

@AMANDA Hello! Great to hear from you, and thanks for the great question. If you are traveling to the UK (England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales) with your dog, tapeworm treatment can occur before or after APHIS endorsement of your health certificate.

So, for example, let’s say you take your dog to a USDA Accredited Vet 10 days prior to travel and the vet issues your UK health certificate – at this point the tapeworm treatment section on the certificate will be blank. You then overnight the health certificate to the APHIS for endorsement. Once you receive back the endorsed health certificate, take it back to your USDA Accredited Vet within 1-5 days of entry into the UK. The vet will administer your dog’s tapeworm (Echinococcus multilocularis) treatment and fill in the tapeworm section on the certificate.

Hope this helps! Safe travels :)

Amanda

Amanda

Hi there! Regarding the tapeworm requirement (step 6): can this be added onto the form AFTER it has been APHIS endorsed (step 5) for entry into the UK? I think the answer is yes based on some of what I’ve read online, but would love to confirm! Thank you!!

Hi there! Regarding the tapeworm requirement (step 6): can this be added onto the form AFTER it has been APHIS endorsed (step 5) for entry into the UK? I think the answer is yes based on some of what I’ve read online, but would love to confirm! Thank you!!

DJANGO

DJANGO

@MELINA Hello and thanks for the question! You will likely have to give your puppy a second rabies vaccine once she is microchipped. This is required for most (if not all) European Union countries. And keep in mind that there is a 21 day waiting period after the rabies vaccine is given. In other words, you cannot enter the EU with your dog until 21 days have passed after her rabies vaccine. Please speak to your vet of course to make sure it is safe to proceed with a second vaccine for your puppy.

For your reference, our little guy Django had received a rabies booster in December 2016 prior to our July 2017 trip to Europe. We got Django microchipped in the spring of 2017 and had to give him ANOTHER rabies booster afterwards.

You can refer to aphis.usda.gov to confirm each EU country’s microchip and rabies requirements for visiting pets (i.e. here is the full policy for bringing dogs and cats from the US to France: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/pet-travel/by-country/eu/pettravel-france) .

@MELINA Hello and thanks for the question! You will likely have to give your puppy a second rabies vaccine once she is microchipped. This is required for most (if not all) European Union countries. And keep in mind that there is a 21 day waiting period after the rabies vaccine is given. In other words, you cannot enter the EU with your dog until 21 days have passed after her rabies vaccine. Please speak to your vet of course to make sure it is safe to proceed with a second vaccine for your puppy.

For your reference, our little guy Django had received a rabies booster in December 2016 prior to our July 2017 trip to Europe. We got Django microchipped in the spring of 2017 and had to give him ANOTHER rabies booster afterwards.

You can refer to aphis.usda.gov to confirm each EU country’s microchip and rabies requirements for visiting pets (i.e. here is the full policy for bringing dogs and cats from the US to France: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/pet-travel/by-country/eu/pettravel-france) .

Melina

Melina

Hello. My puppy just got her rabies vaccine but is not microchipped we are taking her to europe but how do we get ger microchipped and vaccinated after if we have to wait a year to be able to give her another vaccine.

Hello. My puppy just got her rabies vaccine but is not microchipped we are taking her to europe but how do we get ger microchipped and vaccinated after if we have to wait a year to be able to give her another vaccine.

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