FREE U.S. SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS

Can Dogs Get Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

March 04, 2020 5 Comments

Can Dogs Become Infected with Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

Updated April 2020

A pomeranian in Hong Kong recently made news after testing positive for the novel coronavirus that was first detected in China. The dog's owner had previously tested positive for COVID-19, and concerns quickly mounted that dogs may be a new source of infection.

Can domestic dogs catch and fall ill from the highly contagious respiratory virus circulating the globe? Can your four-legged best friend infect you with the virus? Here is everything you need to know.

Can my dog or cat infect me with COVID-19? Can I give COVID-19 to my pet?

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) confirms that there is no evidence dogs or cats are a significant source of COVID-19 infection. In other words, it is very unlikely that your dog or cat infects you with COVID-19. Yes, the virus initially came from an animal source, but the CDC stresses that the novel coronavirus is largely being transmitted on a human-to-human level.

With this said, recent evidence within the United States and across the globe suggests that dogs and cats can become infected with COVID-19 after close contact with their infected owners. Human-to-animal transmission is still considered rare and unlikely, but it is possible based on new findings.

Within the United States, a pug in North Carolina was the first dog to test positive for the coronavirus in late April 2020. Three members of the dog's family were all previously diagnosed with and showing symptoms of COVID-19 in March 2020. 

Two cats in New York state also tested positive for COVID-19 in late April 2020. The cats shows mild symptoms and are expected to make a full recovery.  

A tiger at New York City's Bronx Zoo tested positive for the virus after showing symptoms of COVID-19. Public health employees believe the tiger contracted the virus from an infected zoo employee. Other tigers and lions at the Bronx Zoo have also exhibited symptoms of coronavirus infection.

As of April 30, 2020, the CDC cannot confirm which animals and domesticated pets can be infected with COVID-19, but the CDC does make it clear that both dogs and cats have tested positive for the virus.

If dogs are not a likely source of infection of COVID-19, how did a pomeranian and pug test positive for the virus?

The 17-year old pomeranian tested "weak positive" for COVID-19 after its owner received a positive COVID-19 diagnosis in late February 2020. It was originally believed that this "weak positive" reading was due to traces of the virus on the dog's nose and mouth, although it was later determined the pomeranian did indeed have a low level coronavirus infection.

Per CNN, "experts from the University of Hong Kong, City University and the World Organisation for Animal Health had been consulted, and all 'unanimously agreed that these results suggest that the dog has a low level of infection and it is likely to be a case of human-to-animal transmission.'"

The pug in North Carolina similarly displayed symptoms of illness after three of its human family members tested positive for COVID-19 one month prior. Experts believe the virus was transmitted to the pug from one or more of its infected family members.

Experts continue to believe that the risk of COVID-19 infection in pets is low and, importantly, the risk of transmission from animal-to-human is very unlikely. Human-to-human transmission by far remains the greatest risk of infection.

Have any other pets tested positive for the virus?

In late March 2020, a pet cat in Hong Kong tested positive for COVID-19 despite showing no symptoms of illness. A cat in Belgium also recently tested positive for COVID-19 after its owner became infected with the virus. Both cats had no symptoms of illness, and no evidence suggests that the cats are able to pass on the virus to humans.

Can dogs and cats be tested for COVID-19?

Yes, but the testing of pets is very limited right now and is only being done on a rare case-by-case basis. Routine testing of animals is not currently being done. The CDC also clearly states it does not recommend routine testing of animals at this time.

If I get sick with COVID-19, should I take any precautionary measures around my dog?

Although the CDC states dog-to-human transmission of COVID-19 has not been documented, it recommends avoiding close contact with your pet if you become infected with the virus. There are still a lot of unknowns about COVID-19, so the CDC recommends having a family or friend take care of your pet should you fall ill to the virus.

If you don't have assistance and need to care for your pet yourself, consider wearing a mask and practice frequent hand washing (warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds).

Additional resources





5 Responses

DJANGO
DJANGO

February 10, 2021

@KIM Thank you for the nice message! We’re so glad to hear you found this article useful. It is absolutely a scary and uncertain time. We’ll continue to update this article as new developments arise and as the CDC updates its website with new findings. Best to you and your family – stay well!

Kim
Kim

February 10, 2021

Thank you for this post – your information is very helpful! This is such a scary time with things changing day by day. Thank you again for your post!

DJANGO
DJANGO

February 10, 2021

@MICHAEL Great question! Although tests are available for pet dogs and cats, routine testing is not currently being done. Testing of pets seems to be very limited and only done on a case-by-case basis. We’ve done a lot of reading on pets and COVID-19 and haven’t learned about any other animal testing. It is obviously possible it is happening somewhere, but we ourselves cannot find evidence of it.

With all that said, the CDC and other experts remain confident that the risk of animal-to-human transmission of COVID-19 is unfounded and negligible. They continue to stress that human-to-human physical contact is the greatest risk of infection.

Michael
Michael

February 10, 2021

Thank you for the straight forward information. Are dogs or other animals being tested to the extent that we know with a high rate of confidence that it is not a concern? Stay Safe!

NormanWilkes
NormanWilkes

February 10, 2021

Thanks for the information. This is a pandemic that we should be aware of!
Dog’s Galleries

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in DJANGO Dog Blog

DJANGO Dog Blog - How to Teach Your Dog to Love Riding in a Pet Travel Carrier and Pet Purse - djangobrand.com
How to Train Your Dog to Love Riding in a Pet Travel Carrier

May 12, 2021

In an increasingly pet friendly world, dog carrier bags allow us to take our four-legged family everywhere. Whether you are about to board an international flight, ride on public transportation, go hiking, or spend the afternoon running errands with your four-legged friend, getting your dog used to a pet carrier is essential.

Is your dog new to pet carriers? Nervous, excited, or jumpy in any type of dog bag or pet purse? It is very common for dogs to be scared of new carriers or even try to jump out, especially if they're not used to being carried. How do you teach your dog to love riding in a bag?

In this DJANGO Dog Blog article, we provide several steps to help your dog get used to a new pet carrier.

View full article →

DJANGO Dog Blog - How to Prepare Your Dog to Fly in the Airplane Cabin - djangobrand.com
How to Prepare Your Dog to Fly in the Airplane Cabin

May 05, 2021

Mike and I (Steph) have flown extensively with with our long-haired dachshund Django. Every trip has been relatively easy since Django weighs 14 lbs and comfortably fits in an airline-approved pet carrier. He is also calm, quiet, and loves his airplane-friendly dog bag. We are fortunate that Django is so well behaved once we're up in the air.

Of course, flying with a dog in the airplane cabin is not always so easy. Dogs who have never flown before may be understandably nervous in the crowded airport and once on board. If you have never flown with your four-legged friend before, you might also be unsure what pre-travel steps should be taken.

If you want to take your dog on an in-cabin flight, there are several things you can do to make your trip as safe and seamless as possible. Here is how to best prepare your dog to fly in the airplane cabin.

View full article →

DJANGO KONG Box Subscription Review - djangobrand.com
KONG Box: Unboxing and Review of the Monthly Dog Subscription Box

April 28, 2021 1 Comment

One of the first dog toys we (Mike and Steph) ever bought Django was a KONG Classic rubber dog toy. Easily one of the most popular dog toys on the market, our durable toy has lasted through the years. Just yesterday, Django spent almost 20 minutes carefully licking every ounce of peanut butter out of his KONG toy.

Over the past give years, KONG has been one of our go-to dog toy companies. The brand is known for its high quality products and premium dog treats. We were therefore very excited to learn that KONG introduced its own monthly subscription box back in late 2019.

The following is a comprehensive overview and review of KONG Box based on our own personal experience getting the monthly subscription box for our long-haired dachshund, Django.

View full article →