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How Cold Do Dogs Get?

September 12, 2017

How Cold Do Dogs Get?

Many people believe that dogs are naturally protected from the elements. While certain breeds are biologically equipped for winter conditions - Alaskan Malamutes, Siberian Huskies, and Bernese Mountain Dogs to name a few - most dogs are just as sensitive to the cold as we are.

How cold is too cold?
As a rule of thumb, if it's too cold for you to be outside, then it's too cold for your pup.Insulating dog coats like The Puffer by DJANGO provide needed warmth during cold winter months

Hairless or short-coated dogs with no undercoat, toy breeds, dogs with low body fat, and dogs with short legs are most vulnerable and can easily get hypothermia if left outside in freezing temperatures.

Puppies, older dogs, and those with ailing health should also be bundled up in the winter months. The cold can exacerbate existing medical conditions including arthritis. Lastly, dogs that were raised in warm climates - even mountain dogs and huskies - may not do well in extreme cold.

 

How to Keep Your Dog Warm This Winter
  1. Insulating Dog Coats and Apparel. Bundle up your pup with insulating dog coats and apparel. High quality performance coats like The Puffer Reversible Dog Coat by DJANGO will protect your dog from the elements and enable safer (and warmer) outdoor adventures. Small dogs, dogs with short hair, puppies, and senior dogs have most difficulty controlling body heat and are in extra need extra layers during cold weather months.
  2. Protective Paw Covers. When it snows, consider using boots or some kind of protective paw cover. One option is PawZ by Top Paw - these rubber slip-on booties prevent paws from getting too cold and full of snow. They also prevent sidewalk salt from getting stuck in the paws. You can find PawZ on Amazon.com and in many local retail pet outlets.
  3. Limit Time Outside. On particularly freezing days, shorten the length of walks and encourage more indoor exercise like fetch, tug-of-war and even hide-and-go-seek.
  4. Winter Grooming and Rub-Downs. Any time your dog is wet, dry him or her thoroughly with a towel. Just like humans, dogs are susceptible to chills and illness if they stay cold and damp for too long. If your dog refuses to wear booties outside in the snow, consider leaving a warm bowl of water by your front door. This will help you easily remove any snow, ice and deicers that your dog may have picked from the street or sidewalk.
  5. Keep Warm Indoors. Insulating bedding will help keep your dog warm when temperatures drop at night. If indoor temperatures remain cold during the day, use a non-restrictive dog hoodie or dog coat like The Reversible Puffer by DJANGO. If you use space heaters or wood burning stoves, make sure these are out of your dog's way.

Help your pup brave the chilly months of the year with The Reversible Puffer - a durable and uber-comfy cold weather dog coat.

The windproof and weather-resistant outer shell provides warmth, insulation, and protection from the elements. The interior lining is 100% long fiber cotton, an extremely soft, strong and long-lasting fabric that offers additional comfort and warmth for your adventure dog.





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